7 Incredible Wonders of the Ancient World Lost Forever

The Colossus of Rhodes

The Colossus of Rhodes. Source: 7wonders.org

Even though many have been built, there is a certain number of ancient wonders that have been lost to us forever. The reasons for their disappearance may lie in wars, vandalism or simply, natural disasters. Regardless of the fact that they do not exist any longer, they are worth mentioning due to their importance in both the architectural and historical terms. Let’s change that “tree in the woods” stigma, and show that just because we didn’t see something, doesn’t mean it’s not worth knowing. And there are some cool and pretty neat examples.


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The Colossus Of Rhodes – Wonders Lost in the Earthquake

The Colossus of Rhodes, a statue dedicated to the Greek titan-god of the sun Helios, was built in 280 BC on the Greek island of the same name. It was considered as one of the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World. It was an incredible piece of art due to its height, which reached 30 meters, making it one of the tallest statues of the ancient world. However, it only existed for 54 years until it was hit by an earthquake, depriving the future human generations of a possibility to enjoy this remarkable statue.

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